The Truth
 
 
 
 

Brown's Conference speech reveals a man terminally trapped in his own web of deceit .........

 
Stewart Cowan, 24/9/08

Let's be honest; Gordon Brown cannot be trusted to tell you the sum of 2+2, as amply demonstrated by the Gordon Brown Calculator, courtesy of the Taxpayers' Alliance.

Introduced and endorsed by his wife Sarah at Labour's Conference yesterday, the Prime Minister showed how short on ideas he is. Instead of even pretending he had solid policies that would actually benefit the country as a whole, Mr Brown concentrated on other matters, like his love for his country.

You just have to scroll down the list of articles on this website to see New Labour's love for the people, but still Brown insists:

“The people of Britain would never forget if we failed to put them first.”

On the 10p tax debacle, Brown played for sympathy by saying: "it really hurt," meaning it hurt him. Not financially, of course, unlike millions of others, but no doubt because it proved to be unpopular and cost votes.

The removal of the 10p tax band had been planned a long time before it was implemented, but nevertheless, Mr Brown continued with the con trick:

"We stand and we fight hard for fairness. We don't give in, and we never will."

He did say something that could be recognised as the truth:

"And if people say I’m too serious, quite honestly there’s a lot to be serious about."

He just didn't own up to the contribution his Party made.

Misquote claim

Gordon Brown was accused of misquoting shadow chancellor George Osborne when he said: "In the week that banks were collapsing the man who wants to run our economy ... said 'it's a function of financial markets that people make loads of money out of the misery of others'."

Speaking on Newsnight, Osborne actually said: "No one takes pleasure from people making money out of the misery of others, but that is a function of capitalist markets. The real issue is what is (sic) the causes of this problem ... And the causes of the problem are an economy built on debt, a housing boom that went on for 10 years unchecked."

Nicholas Watt